EHG4889 - Excavation - Tarlogie Farm Dun

Technique(s)

Organisation

University of Aberdeen

Date

7-19 April, 14-31 July 2014

Description

Tarogie Farm Dun is located on a small knoll at the northern edge of a natural terrace at c. 32m O.D. The roundhouse overlooks a steep slope running down to the present day shoreline of the Dornoch Firth situated c. 300 m to the north. A substantial watercourse, the Tarlogue burn, is within a small gorge immediately to the west. The entire site appeared to have been systematically robbed, particularly along the north-west and eastern arcs where the walls were reduced to a scarp and extensive areas of demolition rubble visible overlying the walls and a plantation bank located to the east. Prior to excavation a digital earthwork survey was conducted using a Topcon GR-5 dGPS. In addition the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historic Monuments of Scotland's field survey unit undertook a detailed plane table survey in February 2014. Following the preliminarary archaeological surveys, a single 16 x 12 m trench was opened within the scheduled area across the east side of the roundhouse. Out-with the scheduled area approximately 20m to the east of the entrance of the house a 17 x 1.2m trench and give 1x1 test pits were excavated to gain an understanding of the extent of the midden deposit identified within Trench 2. <1>

Sources/Archives (1)

  • <1> Text/Report: Hatherley C. 2015. Archaeological Excavations at Tarlogie Farm Dun, Ross and Cromarty: Archaeological Assessment Report. University of Aberdeen. Digital.

Map

Location

Location Tarlogie Farm Dun, Dornoch Firth
Grid reference Centred NH 7618 8389 (36m by 32m)
Map sheet NH78SE
Geographical Area ROSS AND CROMARTY
Operational Area CAITHNESS SUTHERLAND AND EASTER ROSS
Civil Parish TAIN

Related Monuments/Buildings (1)

  • Dun Morangie, Tarlogie (Monument)

Record last edited

Jan 15 2018 11:09AM

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