MHG16916 - Corran Byres 5, 6, 7, & 8

Summary

Corran Byres 5, 6, 7, & 8

Type and Period (2)

  • BOTHY (Post Medieval - 1560 AD? to 1900 AD?)
  • BYRE (Post Medieval - 1560 AD? to 1900 AD?)

Protected Status

Full Description

SKL/LOC Local Plan, Mar 1999: P47/3.3.11. POLICY - 2.5.11.
J Aitken : 11/06/01.

Corran
These sites were recorded by NOSAS in 2008/9 as part of an archaeological survey of outer Loch Hourn.

General Roy recorded a small settlement here in c.1750, named Leachran. How the name changed to Corran is another matter. Meryl Marshall and Ann Wakeling (NOSAS) spent a day recording the ruined sheds and other ruined buildings behind the modern township, plus those within the croftlands (figs. 9 and 10; plate 21). Following the 19th century clearances, Corran became a crofting township, the evidence given to the Napier Commission suggesting that the 17 crofters and their families endured great hardship in their attempts to survive on 13.5 acres (Evidence to the Napier Commission, Glenelg August 1883, quoted in English 2000, 108ff). The small size of their plots is clearly visible on fig. 10. Both Camusbane and Corran, in a rental dating to 1824, included a portion of ‘Lochournside’ (Murchison 1957). Islandreoch, Sandwick, Rarsay, Inchkennel and Culnanune were one big sheep run by that time, so ‘Lochournside’ must have included places to the east like Camas Chonalain Beag, Camas Chonalain Mòr, Eilean a Gharb-làin and Rubha Leac an Aoil, all of which have evidence of settlement evidence (NOSAS 2006, 13-17).

The croftlands are enclosed within a substantial head dyke above which there is extensive evidence of turf stripping for use as fuel, for building, and to increase the depth of soil and fertility on the plots. Most crofts appear to have had a barn and they all seem to have had a byre. Sites 1334-1344 are located in improved ground to the NE of Corran village and each is associated with a strip of land. Many of the buildings are still roofed and in use; they are all similar in appearance, but they do not appear to be dwelling houses. The strips of ground appear to be defined by small ditches - which show up clearly on aerial photos - although it is probable that some have disappeared due to more recent cultivation activity.

Site 1326; A line of conjoined sheds or bothies running parallel to the burn and 15m from it, which appear on the OS 1st edition map. They are aligned NW-SE and measure c.60m x 6m in overall length. Some are intact and roofed with corrugated iron, but others are derelict and very tumbled, particularly towards the SE end of the row. The drystone walls, where complete, stand to 2m in height. At least 16 entrances, with thick stone lintels, were noted. <1>

NGR adjusted based on 1999-2001 AP’s <2>

1st Edition OS 6" <3>

Sources/Archives (3)

Map

Location

Grid reference Centred NG 8508 0929 (45m by 49m) (Buffered by site type)
Map sheet NG80NE
Geographical Area SKYE AND LOCHALSH
Civil Parish GLENELG

Finds (0)

Related Monuments/Buildings (0)

Related Investigations/Events (1)

External Links (2)

Comments and Feedback

Do you have any more information about this record? Please feel free to comment with information and photographs, or ask any questions, using the "Disqus" tool below. Comments are moderated, and we aim to respond/publish as soon as possible.