MHG2254 - Chapel; Scarfskerry

Summary

No summary available.

Type and Period (2)

  • CHAPEL (Medieval to 19th Century - 1058 AD to 1900 AD)
  • CEMETERY (Undated)

Protected Status

Full Description

Kirk o' Banks (NAT) Chapel (NR) (rems of)
OS 1:10,000 map, (1976)

Chapel, Kirk o' Banks or Kirk o' Tang: The outlines on turf marking foundations of this chapel are clearly visible close beside the sea to E of Burn of Rattar. It appears to have been a chancelled building with long axis E-W, measuring interiorly about 32ft by 12ft and about 36ft by 15ft overall and of undressed dry stone construction. What appears to have been the wall of the chancel occurs at 17ft from the W end.
RCAHMS 1911; R Campbell 1873.

The grass-covered footings of this chapel measure some 5m by 12m long with an internal division, in which traces of walling can be seen. The surrounding graveyard is enclosed by a D-shaped, grass-covered bank, surviving to a maximum height of 0.5m. The tradition of this site is well known locally. Revised at 1:2500.
Visited by OS (R B) 23 February 1965.

A small church with chancel, about 49ft by 28ft over spread banks. The walls appear as turf-covered banks 2 to 3ft high with some stone protruding. It forms NW corner of small irregular enclosure whose walls appear as low, turf-covered banks 1ft to 1ft 6ins high, from which a few stones protrude.
A D S MacDonald and L R Laing 1969.

This chapel bears a resemblance in plan, dimension, and situation to Chapel of Noss (HU54SW 9) from which has come an early cross-slab. Its situation in relation to its burial ground suggests that the enclosing wall of the latter is secondary. The fact that a pagan burial (ND27SE 7) took place immediately to N of chapel suggests that it may have fallen out of use by the time of that burial, ie. possibly abut 1000, especially as it is likely to have lain within the original burial area of chapel. No additional information.
C E Batey 1982; Information from OS.

The rather imprecise remains of the chapel are generally as described and planned by previous authorities. The original extent of D-shaped enclosing bank is uncertain as the ground to N of the chapel has been considerably disturbed by a later track and rig and furrow ploughing, destroying any evidence for continuation of the enclosure which may have occured on this side. It could not be judged from ground evidence whether this surrounding enclosure post-dates the chapel.
Visited by OS (J B) 5 May 1982.

1st ed OS shows "Kirk of Banks (remasins of)" & "Graveyard (remains of)". Rectangular building in irregular enclosure on edge of field above cliffs - HAW 10/2002


George Watson, Caithness Chapel Sites (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG3470.


Campbell, R, 1873, 'Notice of the discovery of eight silver rings or ancient wrist or ankle rings, in cists near Rattar, Dunnet, Caithness', Proc Soc Antiq Scot Vol. 9 1870-2, p.422-8, 422-4 (Text/Publication/Article). SHG1271.


RCAHMS, 1911, The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions of Scotland. Third report and inventory of monuments and constructions in the county of Caithness, 27, No. 81 (Text/Report). SHG2664.


Macdonald and Laing, A D S and L R, 1969, 'Early ecclesiastical sites in Scotland: a field survey part 1', Proc Soc Antiq Scot Vol. 100 1967-8, p.123-34, 126 (Text/Publication/Article). SHG691.


Batey, C E, 1982, Caithness coastal survey 1982: interim reports 1980-2, Dun 20 (Text/Report). SHG1960.

Sources/Archives (5)

Map

Location

Grid reference Centred ND 2532 7398 (200m by 200m) (Buffered by site type)
Map sheet ND27SE
Civil Parish DUNNET
Geographical Area CAITHNESS

Finds (0)

Related Monuments/Buildings (1)

Related Investigations/Events (0)

External Links (3)

Comments and Feedback

Do you have any more information about this record? Please feel free to comment with information and photographs, or ask any questions, using the "Disqus" tool below. Comments are moderated, and we aim to respond/publish as soon as possible.