MHG31395 - Cemetery, Kiltearn Parish Church

Summary

No summary available.

Type and Period (1)

  • CEMETERY (Established, Medieval to 16th Century - 1058 AD? to 1588 AD (between))

Protected Status

Full Description

See also:
NH66NW0001 Church
J Aitken : 12/12/02
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NH66NW 1 6165 6522.
(NH 6165 6522) Church (NAT)
OS 6" map, Ross-shire, 2nd ed., (1907)

Kiltearn church was built 1791, but its particularly inconvenient situation suggests that the site is that of an early church (NSA 1845), possibly Culdee (Bain 1899). Said to be dedicated to St Tighernac (Macrae 1923). (But see NH66NW 15).
NSA 1845; R Bain 1899; N Macrae 1923. <1>-<3>

Kiltearn Parish Church has been disused for about twenty years. It is still roofed, but the slates are soon to be removed for safety (Info from Mr Macrae, Sexton, Kiltearn parish church).
On the outside of E wall of church, part of a former arch can be seen, probably belonging to an earlier church. There are several 17th and 18th century gravestones in the graveyard. The sexton recalled that the former minister, now in Brechin, had said the church was on the site of a monastery.
No confirmation could be obtained for dedication mentioned by Macrae.
Visited by OS (R D L) 5 May 1963.

Pulpit installed in Lochgoilhead Kirk, Argyll in 1955

See assoc. docs. File (photo).
J Aitken : 12/03/02.

Visited during the Highland Kirkyards project, run by Highland Buildings Preservation Trust. Late 18th century roofless church built on medieval parish chapel site, incorporating a blocked medieval window into the east gable. The 1790-1 Church was built of a piece so the inclusion of the medieval portion was not of necessity, but a deliberate choice by the builders to reference the earlier chapel. The large church structure makes a powerful architectural statement, reflecting the status of its patrons, the Munro family. The church is surrounded by a historic graveyard containing various styles and ages of gravestone as well as a number of burial enclosures. The graveyard has been extended several times to the north and is still in use. <4><5>


Hay, G, 1957, The architecture of Scottish post-Reformation churches, 1560-1843, 89, 194, 272; plan (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG2307.


RCAHMS, 1979, The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. The archaeological sites and monuments of Easter Ross, Ross and Cromarty District, Highland Region, 26, No. 225 (Text/Report). SHG2670.


Stell, G, 1986, Architecture and society in Easter Ross before 1707, 124-5 (Text/Publication/Article). SHG3139.


Leonella Longmore, 2000, Land of Churches (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG2414.


<1> NSA, 1845, The new statistical account of Scotland by the ministers of the respective parishes under the superintendence of a committee of the society for the benefit of the sons and daughters of the clergy, Vol. 14, Ross and Cromarty, 327 (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG2597.


<2> Bain, R, 1899, History of the ancient province of Ross, 57 (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG1941.


<3> MacRae, N, 1923, The romance of a royal burgh: Dingwall's story of a thousand years, 289 (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG2489.


<4> Robinson, B; Scott, M; Wright, A, 03/2010, Highland Kirkyards: Ross and Cromarty (Collection/Project Archive). SHG25133.


<5> Highlands Buildings Preservation Trust, 2009, Photographs of Ross and Cromarty Kirkyards (Image/Photograph(s)). SHG25134.

Sources/Archives (9)

Map

Location

Grid reference Centred NH 6166 6522 (65m by 90m) (Buffered by site type)
Map sheet NH66NW
Geographical Area ROSS AND CROMARTY
Civil Parish KILTEARN

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Related Monuments/Buildings (1)

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