MHG47413 - Corrimony House and Parkland

Summary

No summary available.

Type and Period (3)

  • COUNTRY HOUSE (Built, 19th Century - 1840 AD to 1840 AD (circa))
  • PARK (Established, 19th Century to Unknown - 1840 AD (circa))
  • TREE AVENUE (Established, 19th Century to Unknown - 1840 AD (circa))

Protected Status

  • None recorded

Full Description

NMRS Report: (16/07/2004)
Corrimony House is depicted on OS 1st and 2nd edition maps.

NMRS REFERENCE
Architect: Alexander Ross <1>

New Corrimony House was built in or immediately after 1840, following the estate's transfer into the Ogilvy family, and looks from the photos to have evolved into the prestigious style of house and designed landscape surround which featured on many Victorian Highland estates. The Dictionary of Scottish Architects website mentions architectural work by Duncan Cameron in 1891 and three episodes by the Alexander Ross firm "after 1907" and "before 1923". No reference was found to identify the original architect. The building is not upstanding, but elements of the prestigous parkland and Victorian pleasure gardens survive. This includes the 300m long formal tree-lined avenue, an ornamental pond, and a trackway extending along the valley. Use as cattle pasture has obscured other parkland features, but the isolated trees contribute to the appearance of the site as a former designed landscape park. <2>


<1> RCAHMS, 02/2008, Annual update from Canmore, 261309 (Dataset). SHG24123.


<2> Lynn, D, 11/2008, The Corrimony estate - a summary of its history and sites from the 1800s until today (Text/Manuscript). SHG24033.

Sources/Archives (2)

Map

Location

Grid reference NH 37270 29984 (point)
Map sheet NH32NE
Civil Parish URQUHART AND GLENMORISTON
Geographical Area INVERNESS

Finds (0)

Related Monuments/Buildings (0)

Related Investigations/Events (0)

External Links (1)

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