MHG8444 - Dunskeath Castle

Summary

No summary available.

Type and Period (2)

  • RINGWORK (Early Medieval to 21st Century - 561 AD to 2100 AD)
  • (Alternate Type) MOTTE AND BAILEY (Early Medieval to 21st Century - 561 AD to 2100 AD)

Protected Status

Full Description

Dunskeath Castle (NR). (Site of) Moat (NR).
OS 6" map, Ross-shire, 2nd ed., (1907)

Dunskeath Castle was motte-castle fortified by King William the Lion in 1179. Hugh Miller (1835), says, "We can still trace the moat of the citadel, and part of an outwork which rises towards the hill, but the walls have sunk into low grassy mounds, and the line of the outer mote has long since been effaced by the plough". In recent years almost levelled mound and shallow depression of ditch were still discernible, but site is now subjected to military occupation (Mackenzie 1950).
H Miller 1835; W M Mackenzie 1950;
Visible on RAF APs CPE/Scot/UK/223, 4140-1: 27 June 1947.

The surviving remains consist of 2 concentric semi-circular ditches with inner ramparts, terminating at each end in S on steep naturally defensive slopes. The outer ditch, c.7m wide and 1.5m deep, is truncated in W by ploughing but its track is visible on RAF APs. Its rampart has been mutilated by quarrying and only about 16m (9m wide and 1.5m high) survives in good condition. Whole of inner ditch, c9m wide and 2m deep, is fairly well preserved, but its inner rampart is considerably reduced, probably by erosion. No entrance is evident through defences, though one was visible 1794 (OSA). The irregularly-shaped enclosed area, (a natural spur) is partly occupied by a concrete gun emplacement, which has mutilated interior. The earthwork remains cannot be classified as a motte but are undoubtedly remains of a defensive medieval ring work of some strength.
Resurveyed at 1:2500.Visited by OS (A A) 24 August 1972.

The castle was Scheduled in 1974.

The castle was re-scheduled in 2016 to better protect the surviving remains. <1> <2>


Sir John Sinclair (ed.), 1791-9, The statistical account of Scotland, drawn up from the communications of the ministers of the different parishes, Vol. 13, 20 (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG2606.


Miller, H, 1835, Scenes and legends of the north of Scotland, or the traditional history of Cromarty, 46 (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG2517.


Anderson, A O, 1922, Early sources of Scottish history, A.D. 500 to 1286, Vol. 2, 301-2 (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG1892.


Mackenzie, W M, 1950, 'Old Cromarty Castle', Proc Soc Antiq Scot Vol. 82 1947-8, p.60-8, 60-1 (Text/Publication/Article). SHG1306.


Barrow, G W S and Scott, W W (eds.), 1971, Regesta Regum Scottorum, volume 2: the acts of William I, King of Scots, 1165- 1214, 292, 454 (Text/Publication/Volume). SHG2689.


RCAHMS, 1979, The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. The archaeological sites and monuments of Easter Ross, Ross and Cromarty District, Highland Region, 29, No. 247 (Text/Report). SHG2670.


Stell, G, 1986, Architecture and society in Easter Ross before 1707, 102 (Text/Publication/Article). SHG3139.


Yeoman, P A, 1988, 'Mottes in Northeast Scotland', Scot Archaeol Rev Vol. 5 1988, p.125-33, 131, no. 97 (Text/Publication/Article). SHG1131.


<1> MacIver, M., 2016, Changes to the schedule of Monuments 27/09/2016 (Text/Designation Notification/Scheduled Monument). SHG27658.


<2> Historic Environment Scotland, 2016, Amended entry in the Schedule of Monuments: SM3319: Dunskeath Castle (Text/Designation Notification/Scheduled Monument). SHG27690.

Sources/Archives (10)

Map

Location

Grid reference Centred NH 8070 6898 (140m by 140m) (Buffered by site type)
Map sheet NH86NW
Geographical Area ROSS AND CROMARTY
Civil Parish NIGG

Finds (0)

Related Monuments/Buildings (0)

Related Investigations/Events (0)

External Links (2)

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